Cwmtydu to Aberporth 15.7.21

The small cove of Cwmtydu is accessed by a minor road which winds down through dense woodland. Our taxi drops us in the “high street” and we are lucky enough to find an open cafe run by a gruff but benign Welshman serving coffee, tea and Welsh cakes. He entertains us with stories of people that have come to grief on the precipitous cliff path – lifted off by a helicopters from Llanelli (on the south coast of Wales).

I visit the public toilets which are immaculate while Damian investigates the container accommodation pods mostly used by kayakers.

Following the signs for the Welsh coast path we walk behind the toilets and up into woodland. Llangrannog is probably a good place to stop for lunch.

Coming out of the lovely forest walk we’re back onto the cliffs onto a wide grassy path.

This does not last long however and soon the path narrows, winding up and down and around the small inlets. At one point we walk past a dry ski slope which is named on the map as the Urdd Centre – all sorts of activities are on offer for groups of young people and families. The website makes it look very exciting and what a location.

We are now nearing Llangrannog – you can just about see the narrow path winding around the headland and after a steep descent we are back to civilisation.

It is always a bit of a shock to arrive on a busy beach after hours of silence and isolation – we wonder if we should stop for lunch but decide to carry on and find a quieter spot.

We walk across the beach resisting the urge to wrench off hot heavy leather boots and find ourselves up on the cliff in the company of St. Crannog, a sixth century saint who stands and watches over the village. This bronze sculpture is the work of Sebastian Boyesen who may be Scandinavian with a name like that but he is based in Wales and known for a number of site specific sculptures all over the country. The link below is for his website.

https://www.boyesen.co.uk/the-guardian

A couple of miles on we are getting near to Penbryn Beach but before we get there we experience a spot of drama. The farmer has just been here to give the calf some milk and also drive off the white cow which seems to be preventing the mother from getting near her calf.

We do our best to help but later discover that the mother is actually experiencing some sort of post natal indifference and the white one is a concerned aunty.

Oh well – it reminds me of a time in Scotland when Damian and I came across a cow lying on its side on a hard pebble beach making futile attempts to get on her feet – we thought she needed righting. After several attempts with a rope and sticks we decided to go and inform the local farmer…………….he was completely disinterested.

Penbryn has toilets, a car park and a cafe called the Plwmp Tart – I did wonder why Damian decided to take a photo of me at this point!

From here we follow a path up on the cliffs running parallel to Penbryn Beach – a mile long stretch of golden sand.

Until we reach Tresaith – a sweet little beach where we stop for an ice cream to fortify us for the last haul into Aberporth.

The landscape from here on is covered with caravan sites and holiday cottages – some of which have been fashioned from old railway carriages – a great idea.

And eventually we reach Aberporth, the tide is out so we pick our way over the damp sand, hopping over rivulets that criss cross the beach to reach the car.

My feet are hurting and I need a cold shower but this has been a lovely walk.

Distance: 11 miles

6 thoughts on “Cwmtydu to Aberporth 15.7.21

  1. I’m worrying about the calf! Hope it’s Mother fed it eventually. That was a hot walk by the looks of you. Definitely not a plwmp tart! Beautiful Scenary again. I liked the Saint sculpture and the railway carriages look a nice place to stay.xx

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s